Oklahoma

Former A’s lefty admits pitching perfect game while hungover


Dallas Braden of the Oakland Athletics celebrates after pitching a perfect game against the Tampa Bay Rays on Sunday in Oakland.

Dallas Braden of the Oakland Athletics celebrates after pitching a perfect game against the Tampa Bay Rays on Sunday in Oakland.

Photo: Jed Jacobsohn, Getty Images

Photo: Jed Jacobsohn, Getty Images

Dallas Braden of the Oakland Athletics celebrates after pitching a perfect game against the Tampa Bay Rays on Sunday in Oakland.

Dallas Braden of the Oakland Athletics celebrates after pitching a perfect game against the Tampa Bay Rays on Sunday in Oakland.

Photo: Jed Jacobsohn, Getty Images

Former A’s lefty admits pitching perfect game while hungover

With no major-league baseball being played because of the coronavirus pandemic, all players can do is reminisce and hope the season starts soon. One great Bay Area baseball memory is the A’s Dallas Braden’s perfect game almost exactly 10 years ago.

When talking about that game on May 9, 2010, with The Chronicle’s Susan Slusser, Braden revealed that he pitched the then-19th perfect game in MLB history while he was hungover.

“There are things you don’t do,” Braden told Slusser. “Partaking in libations or adult beverages, that was something I never did before a day game.

“The night before Mother’s Day, though, I did. We were getting after it a little bit.”

Mother’s Day is difficult for Braden, whose mother, Jodie Atwood, died of melanoma when he was in high school.

“It’s just a day you’re trying to get by,” Braden told The Chronicle. “You’re waiting for 12:01 to roll around so it’s over.”

The Oakland lefty joins David Wells in the Hangover Hall of Fame. Wells, in his 2003 autobiography, “Perfect I’m Not: Boomer on Beer, Brawls, Backaches, and Baseball,” admitted to throwing his perfect game in 1998 while “half-drunk with bloodshot eyes, monster breath, and a skull-rattling hangover.”

Braden, who was just 26 years old when he retired 27 straight Tampa Bay Rays, played sparingly since that perfect day because of shoulder problems, announcing his retirement before the start of the 2014 season. He now works as an MLB analyst for NBC Sports Bay Area and Barstool Sports.